I stopped by the Art of the Video Game at the Smithsonian in DC last week.  The exhibit took viewers on a waltz through video gaming from Atari to Xbox. While the kiosks were ok, the conversations that these machines evoked were positively marvelous.  Dads turning to their young kids, and telling them about their early Pong experiences with that badge of honor sound in their voices.  Kids recalling Zelda and early Nintendo as their own right of passage.  A conversation starter, a family experience, and a look a history that’s very much in the moment versus the stodgier versions of typical art exhibits made this a delight. See how many you remember. (Answers below).  

 

Much ado was made of the range of emotions that people express while engaged in a video game.  From astonishment to embarrassment to sheer bliss — the gamut was evident.  

 

Intellivision

Early Nintendo System

Nintendo Entertainment System, Cartridge Based

The Nintendo Entertainment System was an 8-bit system released in 1985. 

The Intellivision System was loved because it rose to the challenge of animating blocky pixels well.  Intellivision titles on display at the exhibit included Utopia, Star Strike and TRON Maze a Tron to name a few.
 
 
 
 The Nintendo Game Cube was the first to use non-cartridge based storage — optical storage. The Nintendo GameCube Game Disc was the software storage medium . Some games which contain large amounts of voice acting or pre-rendered video making them disc-heavy.
 

Sega Genesis

The  The Sega Genesis was Sega’s most successful console.  Introduced in 1988,   Some of its games, like M Mortal Kombat  forced the issues of  content rating systems.
 
 
 
Stay tuned for the next installment where we walk through some of the classic games.  Later, the Sega DreamCast introduced in 1999 took the world by using state of the art video and graphics.  It soared to success only to plummet at SONY PlayStation hit the shelves. Dreamcast was widely hailed as ahead of its time. It saw the release of many including  Crazy TaxiJet Set Radio, and Shenmue, which was the most expensive game produced at the time. The console pioneered online console gaming; it was the first console to include a built-in  modem for online play.
 
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